Yet another social network: Focus on “Real” Friends

From HP’s Social Computing Lab comes news of Friendlee, an entirely new kind of social network that focuses on the intimate connections between close friends, family, and colleagues. The application, designed to operate on your mobile phone, tracks your call and messaging history to provide an ambient awareness of who your “real” friends are and then adds those people to your social network. Not only that, but Friendlee also tracks the businesses you call frequently to identify your preferred services which can then be used as recommendations to your network of friends.

via HP Researchers Design Intelligent Social Network with Focus on “Real” Friends – ReadWriteWeb.

New tech for all you geeks — Facebook or Friendfeed?

Interesting piece on Friendfeed. I’ve never looked at it, but will based on this article. Connectivity is increasing, or is it? Are we truly connected via social networks? Friendfeed appears to be a combination of Facebook, Twitter and instant messaging. If you need a label, it’s a social networking aggregator.

So, here’s a summary. The father of the best web email program on the planet [Google mail] believes that a real-time streaming interface for simplified aggregation of conversation and content from all around the web is going to join the handful of tools we use regularly, like email, IM and blogging.

The biggest question still remaining? Facebook. Buchheit on Facebook:

“Facebook is still very much a closed world of its own. That’s sometimes useful, but other times I want the ability to interact with the outside world and also other systems. For example, if I post something on FriendFeed about a product that I’m using, often someone working on that product (or very knowledgeable about it) will join in on the conversation. That kind of thing can’t happen on Facebook. [Because cross-site search is limited by default privacy restrictions. -ed.] FriendFeed also interoperates much more smoothly with other systems, so I can easily import my blog posts, receive updates via email or IM, or post messages on to Twitter. Things I post on Facebook are not allowed to leave Facebook (except under very strict terms that require deletion within 24 hours, which is why clients such as Seesmic can interface with it, but services such as FriendFeed have a harder time).”

via The Man Who Made Gmail Says Real-Time Conversation is What’s Next – ReadWriteWeb.