Month: November 2011

It huffed and it puffed and it …

(click the thumbnails for a larger image) There they are, finally. At 8:22 there were only three of us present and ready to go. I made my usual early appearance and was able to take my time getting ready. What to wear? Temps are going to vary but right now I’m cold. Yes, John, I know that I will warm up as I ride but right now I’m cold. Light, sleeveless windbreaker … no, go with the full windbreaker. I can always take it off. A bit of pedaling around the Burnet Middle School parking lot now. Spin those...

Read More

An enigmatic view of China

The topic de rigueur is the blasting of China in every imaginable way:  theft of trade secrets, the imminent owning of America, trade imbalance, stealing of our manufacturing base, and more. The current political “debates”1 apparently require a load of diatribes against the Chinese. Coffee shop talk echoes with it. But in World War II China was a tremendous ally. A good friend of my family flew The Hump from India into China where supplies were staged in support of US forces. The Chinese did spotting for the Flying Tigers to relay information about fighters launched from Japan. The 1st American Volunteer Group (AVG) of the Chinese Air Force in 1941–1942, famously nicknamed the Flying Tigers, was composed of pilots from the United States Army (USAAF), Navy (USN), and Marine Corps (USMC), recruited under presidential sanction and commanded by Claire Lee Chennault. The ground crew and headquarters staff were likewise mostly recruited from the U.S. military, along with some civilians. via Flying Tigers – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. I was reminded of that role of the Chinese while watching the classic movie, God Is My Co-Pilot. Robert L. Scott has dreamed his whole life of being a fighter pilot, but when war comes he finds himself flying transport planes over The Hump into China. In China, he persuades General Chennault to let him fly with the famed Flying Tigers, the heroic band...

Read More

In an emergency, you need a ham …

… or really quite a few hams. ARES drill No, not the 4-legged pork kind of hams but the Amateur Radio Emergency Services kind, “ARES” for short. On November 5 amateur radio operators from the Burnet-Llano County ARES organization participated in a statewide exercise to hone the skills they would use in an actual emergency to assist local hospitals, government, and law enforcement agencies. Over a dozen of the “hams” communicated around the Burnet and Llano County area via their local radio repeater system and across the state using both voice and digital radio networks into every corner of...

Read More

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Follow Me

Bad Behavior has blocked 318 access attempts in the last 7 days.

Pin It on Pinterest

%d bloggers like this: